Whiterocks Fish Hatchery.


HOME
News & Announcements

FISHING REPORTS

STATEWIDE
HOTSPOTS
FLYFISHING
ICE FISHING
BASS
WALLEYE
NORTH of I-70
SOUTH of I-70
TIGER TROUT

SUBMIT YOUR FISHING REPORT


UTAH FISHING INFORMATION

ARTICLES

LAKES & RIVERS

FISHING REGULATIONS

WEATHER REPORTS


TODAY'S MOON PHASE

SUN RISE/SET & MOON RISE/SET

LINKS

COMMENTS

Utah Fishing Guide

rainbow trout logo for utah fishing


Whiterocks Fish Hatchery to close for renovation

The Whiterocks State Fish Hatchery will close for renovation soon but, before it does, anglers across the state will continue to benefit from the fish the hatchery provides.
The Whiterocks hatchery is two miles north of the town of Whiterocks in northeastern Utah. The hatchery produces rainbow, brown, brook and cutthroat trout, and kokanee salmon.
The kokanee salmon the hatchery raises are stocked in Strawberry and Flaming Gorge reservoirs. Most of the cutthroat trout are stocked in Strawberry Reservoir. The brook trout are stocked in lakes in the Uinta Mountain and other lakes and reservoirs across Utah. The brown trout are stocked in rivers and streams throughout the state. Rainbow trout from the hatchery are stock mostly in lakes, reservoirs, rivers and streams in Duchesne, Uintah and Daggett counties.

Reconstruction
The hatchery will close for reconstruction soon and will remain closed for about 1 years while the work is completed. During that time, the old hatchery building will be removed. Reconstruction will include work on the hatchery's spring area, a new hatchery building, installation of a low head oxygen system and repairs to the existing raceways. If more money becomes available, new, covered raceways will be built.
The hatchery is staffed by Ron Morrill, Pat Lakin and Ivan Hamilton, who are three full-time Division of Wildlife Resources employees.

History
The land for the Whiterocks Fish Hatchery was purchased in 1923 and a small hatchery building and dirt raceways were constructed. Concrete raceways and other buildings were constructed later. Water for the hatchery comes from springs north of the hatchery. The temperature of the spring water is about 50 degrees year around.
In the early days, fish at the hatchery were fed horse meat. Older or unwanted horses, and wild horses from the Book Cliff area, were herded to corrals at the hatchery and used for fish feed. Today, commercially processed fish feed in used.
The way some of the fish are stocked has also changed. In the early days, fish were stocked in lakes and streams of the Uinta Mountains by horse back. The fish were loaded in milk cans that were placed in pack saddles, and then the horses would head for the mountain lakes. Today, the Uinta Mountain lakes are stocked by airplanes and trucks.

Article provided by the Utah Department of Wildlife Resources








Rich Pulham Productions
Photography | Web design

Copyright © Rich Pulham
All rights reserved

Hosting by Internet Content Developers

[an error occurred while processing this directive]