Utah Walleye Fishing Reports


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Utah Walleye Fishing Reports

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Revised 07-13-18


Links give descriptions of the lake and facilities available. Check proclamtion for details on fishing restrictions as these may not be complete.

WHIRLING DISEASE -- For waters indicated, please prevent the spread of WHIRLING DISEASE by cleaning mud from waders and equipment. DO NOT TRANSPORT any parts of fish caught here to other waters. Click here for DWR information.

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY -- For more information on individual lakes and fish species: Click here for DWR information.

Bear River

Brook Trout, Brown Trout, Bullhead Catfish, Channel Catfish, Crappie, Cutthroat Trout, Green Sunfish, Largemouth Bass, Rainbow Trout, Walleye, Whitefish, Yellow Perch

No recent reports.

Deer Creek Reservoir

Brown Trout, Cutthroat Trout, Largemouth Bass, Rainbow Trout, Smallmouth Bass, Walleye, Yellow Perch

(Jul 13) Boat traffic has been heavy, but anglers are catching smallmouth bass, crappie and 16- to 18-inch rainbow trout. For smallmouth bass, a little bit of everything has been working. Anglers have been catching smallmouths using flashy pearl or flashy silver Berkley Flicker Shad Pro Flash's, various swimbaits, various gold and silver spinners and Gary Yamamoto Senko's rigged in either a nose rig or whacky rig. For trout, try trolling at about 1.82.0 mph with the rig suspended in about 20 to 30 feet of water. Try using Luhr-Jensen popgear, Mack's Wedding Rings, Worden's Flatfish's or Christenson's Lakeshore Tackle pink squids and Dakota dodgers.

(Jun 28) There is a lot of boat traffic during the weekends, but anglers are catching 14- to 18-inch walleye, 8- to 10-inch perch and 16- to 18-inch rainbows. For walleye, anglers have had success trolling at about 2.02.4 mph using walleye harnesses tipped with a nightcrawler. Try using Northland Pro Walleye Crawler Harnesses in UV fire perch, gold Christmas or hot steel, or try using Berkley Flicker Shad in black silver or blue smelt. For trout, try trolling at about 1.82.0 mph with the rig suspended in about 20 to 30 feet of water. Try using Luhr-Jensen popgear, Berkley Flicker Minnows, Mack's Wedding Rings, Worden's Flatfish or Blue Fox Pixee spoons.

Regulations

Holmes Creek Reservoir

Bluegill, Crappie, Largemouth Bass, Walleye

(Jun 23) Fishing at Holmes Creek Reservoir appears to be fair to good right now. One family of anglers reported good success last week using PowerBait. They caught several planter-sized rainbow trout. Generally this is a good time of year to fish the reservoir for largemouth bass as well, but we have not received any recent reports on the quality of the bass bite at this location.

Regulations

Jordan River

Brown Trout, Channel Catfish, Largemouth Bass, Rainbow Trout, Sunfish, Walleye, White Bass

No recent reports.

Lake Powell

Bluegill, Brown Trout, Channel Catfish, Crappie, Largemouth Bass, Northern Pike, Smallmouth Bass, Striped Bass, Rainbow Trout, Walleye

STOP QUAGGAG MUSCLE

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Jul 12) by Wayne Gustaveson

Lake elevation: 3,608 feet Water temperatures: 8084F

The water temperature is in the 80s all day and night. That is great for swimming, wakeboarding and scuba diving but it makes fishing a bit more challenging. Here are some ways to beat the heat and catch some fish.

Lakewide, the best fishing is for smallmouth bass. You can catch bass in the morning and evening using plastic baits fished near shore or around the submerged islands that are now coming out of the water as the water level goes down. Target rocky structure at a depth of 10 to 25 feet for best results. Use plastic single or double tails grubs, swimbaits, Yamamoto D-Shad and topwater lures. If you hit the lake just before dawn, the top water fishing for bass is incredible. Once the sun comes up bass fishing slows down as fish go deep looking for crayfish. It lights up again near sunset as the light diminishes and fish get more aggressive.

You can still catch an occasional walleye by trolling in the morning near rocky structure, but the catch rate is declining. Walleye are more active at night. Target them in rocky habitat at depths of 15 to 30 feet right as the sun comes up and goes down and the daylight fades.

Each year in July, we have the challenge of catching 60 stripers for a disease certification check up. The common result is that stripers are disease free of viruses. For the first time this year, we failed to collect our required numbers of fish. A slight breeze this morning, kept the slurping stripers away from view. Our fallback position was to use bait along the walls in Navajo Canyon but that was not up to par. In fact, we only caught 5 stripers with three boats and nine anglers fishing from Navajo Canyon to the San Juan. We didn't see any boils or slurps in the main channel from Wahweap to Cha Canyon because of the slight breeze that kept the fish down. Some days fishing is not as good. We chose one of those days. That really makes me want to go out tomorrow because I know it will be better then.

The best striper fishing is in the far northern lake, where full blown striper boils are wide open from North Wash to Good Hope Bay. Launching at Hite is no longer possible due to dropping lake level, but it is worth the long run uplake from Bullfrog to the Horn to chase boiling stripers.

If you go, pick a day with calm water and no wind in the forecast to make sure the fish will come to the top to feed.

Many people are camping on the shore of the lake in houseboats or tents. There are more fishing opportunities than those mentioned above. Catfish are really aggressive now and are easy to catch on the sandy beaches where boats can park. Both bluegill and green sunfish are in the shallows and you can see them in shallow water where there is brush. Many of the brushy sites are drying out as the lake declines but sunfish are still near those areas. To find sunfish, look for blocky rocks that fish can use as shade near the dried brush. Use small hooks and small worms to catch some very impressive bluegill that are now just finishing up their spawning ritual. After spawning fish get hungry and are easier to catch. Fishing is always great at the lake if you pick the right species, at the right time, and the right spot.

(Jul 5) by Wayne Gustaveson

Lake elevation: 3,609 feet Water temperatures: 7583F

Lake Powell is busy the week of July 4. There are lots of visitors lakewide enjoying the sun and warm water. Houseboats, fast running boats, kayaks, wake boats and all other watercraft are on the lake now. When heading to Lake Powell for vacation, it is wise to bring along a fishing rod to broaden the lake experience. Anglers need to get up early and then stay up late to catch fish.

Early morning is the best time to catch fish. Rig up with a surface lure and toss that lure toward shore to attract smallmouth bass, largemouth bass and stripers. Bass will be near stickups or rocky cover. Stripers will be slurping anywhere from the mid channel in most long canyons to open water in the main channel. All these fish are very cooperative from the time the sky lightens in the east until the sun hits the water. The best lures for slurpers are small narrow topwater lures, small white jigs or swim baits, and Kastmaster type spoons.

As the sun comes up, so do the skiers, wake boarders and surfers. The lake gets busy and rough so be selective in choosing your fishing location. Run to the end of the long canyons like the Escalante, San Juan, Navajo or near Hite. Or join in with those that are celebrating their time on the water with swimming or water toys.

In busy areas, you can still find a deep canyon or cove and fish with bait for stripers. Schools are moving along the canyon walls and can be found with a little effort. There were recent reports of striper schools at the mouth of the San Juan, the main channel in the Escalante Arm and at the mouth of Moki Canyon.

Big walleye have been caught recently while trolling with deep diving Fat Free shad lures. Down rigger trolling is another way to get the lure down to the cooler temperature zone where most fish hangout while waiting to head back to the warm surface water to chase some more small shad. During the day, fish move quickly from cooler, deeper water to the surface and then they go deep again in short order. This up and down activity really makes fish fight well during the hot days of summer.

Catfish are actively spawning in the backs of many canyons. When in spawning mode, catfish are very active and catchable. Head to the back of the canyon where water is less than 25 feet deep. Use hot dog rounds, shrimp, worms or three-inch artificial Gulp minnows. Begin fishing for catfish at dusk and continue into the night. Circle hooks are great hooks for catching catfish. It is possible to catch catfish with just a rod propped up in a rod holder with a bell on the tip to announce when a catfish come calling. But I prefer to hold the rod in my hand to feel the first bite and then set the hook when the cat comes back for the second look. You will catch more catfish if you hold the rod instead of propping it up.

(Jun 28) by Wayne Gustaveson

Lake elevation: 3,610 feet Water temperatures: 7580F

We observed slurping stripers all over the lake on our weekly trip. The average size of slurping stripers was 14 inches, but they range from 8 to 18 inches. The water was warm on top, 7880F, which means that adult stripers cannot come to the top and spend much time without suffering severe stress. When young stripers see a larval shad school near the surface, they form a scavenging line and attack the small shad. Since these shad cannot swim fast, stripers eat as many shad as possible in 15 seconds and then go back down to 30 feet. That makes it hard to see the striper school and then get in range to make a cast while they are still on the surface. Normally the striper school goes down and then quickly pops back up on the next shad school. If they surface near your boat, then a quick cast will possibly catch a fish. If stripers are out of casting range, you need to move your boat quickly to get in range. The action is exciting, but the catch rate is low.

Here are a few lures that worked well: a small white clouser minnow fly attached behind a bubble filled with water and a small skinny surface lure (Ima Skimmer) and a Kastmaster spoon. You need to throw long casts to the quickly moving striper school. That is not easy with a small, lightweight lure with limited casting range.

You must cast in front of the lead striper. If your cast lands in the middle of the school, the fish often spook, jump and then swim deep. It is better to throw well in front of the school and let it rest until the school gets in range. Then start working the lure, bringing it right in front of the slurping fish. When all this happens, you can catch a fish. When any of the other possibilities happen you cast too short, behind the school or too late the school will sound and you will have to wait for the next school to surface. When one school goes down, just look around to see more schools surfacing in the vicinity. Also, look at your graph to see if the fleeing school goes under your boat. If so, deploy a spoon to the depth indicated on the graph to catch more fish.

We observed slurps from Warm Creek to Rock Creek in the main channel and midway back in many canyons, from Bullfrog to Trachyte and in the Escalante and San Juan Arms. Slurps are lakewide, but the intensity and catch rate is greater further north.

Bait fishing for larger stripers is still working, particularly along the main channel and in many canyons. It will take a few tries to find fish, but you are more likely to find fish in spots that are not reported often. Recent reports have come from the mouth of San Juan and Lake Canyon, where anglers have found big catches of stripers.

Trolling for walleye in the shade of the canyon walls early in the morning is working. Try the following lures: Live Target threadfin shad (Copper color), Lucky Craft 78 or 100 XD pointers in chartreuse shad. The shady walls between Piute and Deep Canyon in the San Juan are a good place to try, but any similar landscape may work lakewide.

Smallmouth bass are hitting surface lures at first light in the morning. Then they go deeper, so fish at 20 to 40 feet to catch bass during the daytime.

Bluegill are still spawning. You can see the circular nests in three feet of water near the shoreline or any large rocky area. Use a tiny jig head with a piece of live worm attached to catch these brightly colored fish.

Catfish are active from sundown into the night. Use table scraps, worms or anchovies on the sandy beach behind the houseboat. It's a great activity to keep the kids interested as it cools down after a hot day at the lake.

(Jun 21) by Wayne Gustaveson

Lake elevation: 3,611 feet Water temperatures: 7376F

My weekly fishing trip began in perfect fashion. We stopped and trolled at Padre Butte, hoping to catch a walleye. We deployed our lures and trolled for 50 yards before both rods hit hungry fish. My partner caught a smallmouth bass and I caught a 14-inch walleye. This seemed like the perfect start to a perfect day. Within a few minutes, however, the wind picked up and conditions changed.

Our plan was to chase slurping stripers from Padre Bay to Rock Creek. We saw a lot of stripers slurping shad near the surface, but they were usually gone before we could get in range to make a decent cast. Surprisingly, the best slurp was on the return trip in the main channel where boat wakes were stirring up the water into two foot waves. This school of stripers stayed up long enough to make a decent cast and catch some fish. Bullfrog anglers reported identical fishing: quick slurps and no fish caught. Striper slurps are still going strong in calm water. When it's calm, it's much easier to see the surface disturbance, approach quickly and make a good cast. This will continue until the rapidly growing larval shad are big enough to swim fast. Then, the stripers will boil as they round up the shad school and attack. That will happen in July and August.

When we gathered fishing reports at the end of the day, it was obvious that anglers using bait along the canyon walls caught more and larger stripers than we did. The average catch for anglers using bait was 10 to 20 stripers. Bait fishing was good in Antelope, Navajo, Labyrinth Wall and Rock Creek. In the northern lake, Moki Wall and the cove just upstream from the mouth of Moki were good bait spots. Night fishing under green lights in Bullfrog Bay is the best way to catch a large number of stripers.

Another hot ticket in the northern lake is chasing slurps in Red Canyon or the Good Hope Bay area. Anglers catch more stripers, shad and fish there. If I had a day to fish up north, I would go to Good Hope Bay.

Smallmouth bass are the best fish to target and catch right now. They really like topwater lures at first light in the morning, lake wide. After the sun comes up, switch to plastic shad-shaped worms on a drop shot rig. Fish those rigs from 10 to 15 feet early and switch to 17 to 22 feet later in the day. The best habitat is submerged ledges, scattered boulder-sized rocks or even muddy points where crayfish gather. Smallmouth bass will hit plastic baits all day long. Bass caught this week ranged from small to 3.5 pounds. Kids fishing for the first time will be able to catch both bass and stripers by using these techniques.

You can still catch walleye by trolling and casting early and late and under muddy colored water during the day. Bluegill and green sunfish are still holding at nest sites where a few stick ups or tumbleweeds are submerged. Channel catfish are spawning and active day and night in the backs of the canyons from 10 to 29 feet on a sandy bottom.

Regulations

Provo River

Brook Trout, Brown Trout, Cutthroat Trout, Rainbow Trout, Walleye

(Jul 13) Lower: There has been a lot of raft traffic, but the water flows have lessened. Watch for caddis and midge hatches throughout the day, and an occasional pale morning dun mayfly hatch. Try using zebra midges, cased-caddis nymphs, sow bugs, PMD nymphs and streamers.

Middle: The water flows are great for this time of year, and there are plenty of hatches happening. Watch for caddis, midges, pale morning dun mayflies, yellow stoneflies and some green drakes. Try using drake nymphs, zebra midges, sow bugs, caddis nymphs, PMD nymphs, soft-hackled flies and streamers.

(Jun 28) Lower: The flow is fairly stable for this time of year. Caddis and midges are hatching regularly, and pale morning dun mayflies are beginning to hatch. Try using zebra midges, sow bugs, cased-caddis nymphs, streamers, pale morning dun emergers, prince nymphs or pheasant tails.

Middle: The Middle Provo is flowing higher than normal. Continue to focus on the edges, deeper pools or areas that provide some refuge from the flows. Caddis and midges are hatching regularly, and pale morning dun mayflies are beginning to hatch. Try using drake nymphs, cased-caddis nymphs, sow bugs, hares ears or pale morning dun nymphs. Anglers are also having success using white or purple streamers on sunny days.

Regulations

Starvation Reservoir

Brown Trout, Crayfish, Smouthmouth Bass, Walleye

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Jul 13) Anglers are having the best success for walleye in the early morning and late evenings fishing with glow-in-the-dark jigheads, curlytail lures and nightcrawlers. Anglers should fish shallow, sloping shorelines with rock and some vegetation, and make sure to set the hook when you feel a bump. Smallmouth fishing has also picked up along the rocky edges. Biologists have been conducting surveys and have found high densities of smaller walleye. Anglers are being encouraged to harvest these small walleye to help balance the fishery and produce healthier walleye populations. Biologists are also asking anglers to voluntarily release crappie to help establish the population.

(Jun 28) Anglers are having the best success for walleye in the early morning and late evenings fishing with glow-in-the-dark jigheads, curlytail lures and nightcrawlers. Anglers should fish shallow, sloping shorelines with rock and some vegetation, and make sure to set the hook when you feel a bump. Smallmouth fishing has also picked up along the rocky edges. Biologists have been conducting surveys and have found high densities of smaller walleye. Anglers are being encouraged to harvest these small walleye to help balance the fishery and produce healthier walleye populations. Biologists are also asking anglers to voluntarily release crappie to help establish the population.

Regulations

Utah Lake

Bluegill, Bullhead Catfish, Channel Catfish, Largemouth Bass, Smouthmouth Bass, Walleye, White Bass

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Jul 13) Anglers are catching channel catfish that are 25 inches or longer. Try using chicken livers encased in nude nylon, shrimp soaked in chicken blood, nightcrawlers or Magic Bait Catfish Bait. There is currently an algal bloom warning in place at Utah Lake. You can still fish in the lake, but avoid areas with scum.

(Jun 28) Anglers are catching large channel catfish some weighing more than two pounds on a regular basis. Try using chicken livers encased in nude nylon, shrimp soaked in chicken blood, nightcrawlers or Magic Bait Catfish Bait. There is currently an algal bloom warning in place at Utah Lake. You can still fish in the lake, but avoid areas with scum. Wear gloves while cleaning the fish. When you're done, wash your hands with clean water. Be sure to discard the entrails and only eat the fillets. Before cooking, rinse the fillets thoroughly with clean water.

Regulations

Willard Bay

Bullhead Catfish, Channel Catfish, Crappie, Largemouth Bass, Perch, Smallmouth Bass, Walleye, Wipers (hybrid), Yellow Perch

(Jul 13) Fishing has been extremely slow over the last two weeks. Several anglers report very little success despite trying a variety of methods.

(Jun 29) The water temperature is still around 75 degrees and fishing on the reservoir is still hit-or-miss. A few boats were having difficulty hooking into any wipers or walleye, or weren't catching very many. On the other hand, one pair of anglers landed one wiper and three walleyes each. They reported trolling a variety of lures such as Rat-L-Traps and deep-diving Rapalas at 2.7 mph. Another angler who was trolling a Rat-L-Trap at 2.5 mph caught one four-pound wiper in a little over 15 feet of water but didn't catch anything else after this. Another angler caught one fat, decent-sized walleye as their only catch for the day by trolling Shad Cranks. One angler who was trolling in the evening caught one 28-inch catfish in 10 feet of water. One angler reported sighting a very small and brief boil this week.

(Jun 23) Willard was very hit-or-miss this week. From the reports we received, anglers either had a great catch or got no bites at all. Wipers were the catch we received the most reports of this week, but recently we've received several reports of a good smallmouth bass and catfish bite as well. Trolling has been working best if you're fishing for wipers. You can use a variety of lures to catch wipers, but one group of anglers who trolled the west dike during the evening at 2.5 mph caught wipers on a blue and white deep-diving Rapala. Recently, anglers have also recommended trolling the north end of the reservoir.

Regulations

Yuba Reservoir

Channel Catfish, Northern Pike, Rainbow Trout, Walleye, Yellow Perch

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Jul 13) Fishing has been slow for sportfish, but anglers are catching carp that are five pounds or heavier. Try using bread, chicken liver, nightcrawlers or chicken blood-soaked shrimp to catch carp.

(Jun 28) Fishing has been slow for sportfish, but anglers are catching large carp, some of which weigh more than five pounds. For carp, try using bread, chicken liver, nightcrawlers, or shrimp soaked in chicken blood.

Regulations









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