Utah Walleye Fishing Reports


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Utah Walleye Fishing Reports

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Revised 09-14-18


Links give descriptions of the lake and facilities available. Check proclamtion for details on fishing restrictions as these may not be complete.

WHIRLING DISEASE -- For waters indicated, please prevent the spread of WHIRLING DISEASE by cleaning mud from waders and equipment. DO NOT TRANSPORT any parts of fish caught here to other waters. Click here for DWR information.

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY -- For more information on individual lakes and fish species: Click here for DWR information.

Bear River

Brook Trout, Brown Trout, Bullhead Catfish, Channel Catfish, Crappie, Cutthroat Trout, Green Sunfish, Largemouth Bass, Rainbow Trout, Walleye, Whitefish, Yellow Perch

No recent reports.

Deer Creek Reservoir

Brown Trout, Cutthroat Trout, Largemouth Bass, Rainbow Trout, Smallmouth Bass, Walleye, Yellow Perch

(Sep 14) Recreational traffic has begun to subside. Anglers are catching walleyes, 16–18 inch rainbow trout and smallmouth bass. For walleye, try trolling a Northland Pro Walleye Crawler Harness or jigging a VMC Neon Moon Eye jig with a chartreuse shad, smelt or watermelon pearl 3-inch Berkley Gulp! Minnow. For smallmouth, try drop shotting a Gary Yamato Senko in watermelon moon dust or green pumpkin in a wacky rig and bounce it across the bottom. You may also want to try a Keitech Swing Impact swimbait in green pumpkin chartreuse, male perch or black shad in a Carolina rig and slowly move it across the bottom. For trout, try trolling at 1.8–2.2 mph with the lure suspended in 20–30 feet of water. Try using Luhr-Jensen Bolo Flex-I-Troll, a Worden's Flatfish or a black silver, blue smelt, clear or pearl white Berkley Flicker Shad.

(Aug 24) There is a lot of recreational traffic, especially on the weekends. Anglers are catching 14- to 16-inxh smallmouth bass and assorted sized rainbows. For smallmouth, try using a Gary Yamato Senko in watermelon moon dust, natural shad, or green pumpkin in a wacky rig with a 1/0 Gamakatsu drop shot hook and bounce it across the bottom, or try a Keitech Swing Impact swimbait in green pumpkin chartreuse, male perch, or black shad in a Carolina rig and slowly move it across the bottom. For trout, try trolling at 1.8-2.2 mph with the lure suspended in 22 to 26 feet of water. Try using Mack's Lures Smile Blades, Luhr-Jensen School-O-Minnows Lake Trolls with a nightcrawler, or Mack's Lures Wedding Rings. For those fishing from shore, target locations where you can fish in about 25 to 30 feet of water and use a nightcrawler tipped with a white marshmallow or PowerBait Trout Nibbles.

Regulations

Holmes Creek Reservoir

Bluegill, Crappie, Largemouth Bass, Walleye

(Sep 14) This week the bass were hitting top water. Try poppers or buzz-baits. Try evenings and mornings. Remember that a free Walk-In Access permit is required to fish on this privately owned reservoir.

(Sep 1) Remember, a free Walk-In Access permit is required to fish on this privately owned reservoir. Trout stocking usually resumes in October. Anglers report good fishing for small bluegill.

Regulations

Jordan River

Brown Trout, Channel Catfish, Largemouth Bass, Rainbow Trout, Sunfish, Walleye, White Bass

No recent reports.

Lake Powell

Bluegill, Brown Trout, Channel Catfish, Crappie, Largemouth Bass, Northern Pike, Smallmouth Bass, Striped Bass, Rainbow Trout, Walleye

STOP QUAGGAG MUSCLE

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Sep 14) by Wayne Gustaveson

Lake elevation: 3,595 feet Water temperatures: 75–80°F

Spoon up some stripers!

Lake Powell continues to drop about a foot per week. The Castle Rock Cut should be passable for another two months. It was recently announced that a High Flow Experiment (HFE) will occur during the first week of November. At that time the outflow from the dam will increase dramatically to move sediment from the river bottom to the river banks further downstream. This event improves habitat for native fish in the river and in backwaters. It is likely that the Castle Rock Cut will no longer be open after the HFE event occurs.

The big news now is that striper schools are actively chasing shad schools in deep, open water. That means it is time to pull out the jigging spoons and start fishing in deep water in the canyons and main channel. If you are lucky it is still possible to see a quick striper boil. You may be able to get to the school quickly and catch some fish on top water lures. More importantly a surface feeding event marks the spot where large schools of stripers are holding in deeper water. Get to the boil site as quickly as possible and if the fish have gone down, deploy spoons into the depths, let the spoon hit bottom and then speed reel the spoon back to the boat.

Speed Reeling definition: When the lure hits bottom start reeling the spoon as fast as physically possible. If fish are seen on the graph at a certain depth, pause and jig a few times at the suspected holding depth. Then continue reeling very fast until you are sure that the spoon is above the holding depth of the school. Retrieve the spoon, cast again, then repeat the retrieval process.

If you don’t see boils, use the graph to search for a large striper school, which may be holding somewhere between 30 and 90 feet of water. When a striper school is detected, stop quickly and drop spoons immediately. Let the spoon hit bottom to help you know where the spoon is in relation to the fish. If the school is 10 feet off the bottom than reel up four turns and start jigging the spoon up three feet and letting it fall back down three feet. Stripers often follow the spoon and then hit as it falls. It is more likely to feel the fish as you jig upwards instead of feeling the fish hit the lure as it falls. A hooked striper excites the other fish in the school as they see the fish swimming with a ‘shad’ in its mouth. The school follows the hooked fish looking for more food. It is often possible to “lead” a striper school that follows the boat. When a fish is caught, unhook the fish as quickly as possible, and return the spoon to the water immediately to keep the school under the boat and actively engaged in searching for more shad. It is not unusual to lead a striper school for over an hour as the boat drifts with the breeze, while catching 50 or more stripers in one drift.

Spooning hotspots recently include Knowles Canyon, Good Hope Bay, Dome Rock in Bullfrog Bay, Piute Canyon in the San Juan, 50 Mile Canyon in the Escalante, and Oak Canyon upstream from Rainbow Bridge.

Smallmouth bass fishing continues to be excellent lake wide. Dropshot rigged Yamamoto Shad-shaped worms and other plastic baits are working well all day along the shoreline. Look for long rocky points that reach out into the lake at the new lower water levels we are now dealing with. Bass will be holding at 10-20 feet at the end of the point and also at the same depth perpendicular to the point.

Most fish are perking back up now that the water temperature is dropping into the mid 70s in the morning. Expect to still catch a few largemouth bass, bluegill, walleye and catfish while fishing for your favorite species of fish.

(Sep 7) by Wayne Gustaveson

Lake elevation: 3,596 feet Water temperatures: 76–80°F

The air temperature is cooling down now that September is here. Water temperature is following suit. That cooling makes it easier for stripers to stay near the surface and boil on a shad school. The surface feeding activity that was confined to the northern half of the lake is now a thing of the past. Boils are now reported from Wahweap to the Good Hope Bay.

This week, expect to see some surface activity in the southern lake from Wahweap to Rainbow Bridge. There were recent reports of boiling stripers in Ice Cream Canyon (Wahweap Bay), Padre Bay and the mouth of Rock Creek. Generally, this means that it is possible to find surface feeding fish anywhere and at any time of day. Unfortunately, the surface action only last for a short time. Throw topwater lures into the boiling fish as long as they stay up. A good school may boil for 10-15 minutes which means you can catch 10 or more from that single event. More often they only stay up for 5 minutes or less.

Do not be discouraged when they go down quickly. Treat the surface activity as a marker buoy. Head to the spot and watch the graph intently. These surfacing stripers are searching for shad to eat and not finding that many in the southern lake. When they go down they are still searching for food. Find the school on the graph and drop spoons to the hungry fish and get ready for some incredible fish-catching action. Spoons resemble shad that stripers are searching for so they respond quickly to your bait. The striper school follows any fish with a shad [or spoon] in its mouth so they will stay under the boat as long as the spoons keep dropping. The action can be as intense as fishing a surface boil. Watch the graph for the visual effect that surface fishing offers. Unhook the fish quickly, immediately drop the spoon back down to find another hungry fish.

Spoons that work well include Kastmasters, Fle Fly, Real Image and Colt Sniper. These long thin spoons are 'slab spoons' which all work well for hungry stripers. If the striper school is holding at 30 feet, drop the spoon to 40 feet and then reel it up through the feeding fish. If no fish hit the lure after coming up 20 feet then drop again to 40 feet. Try to keep the spoon in the school as long as possible so the fish can see it and quickly get to it. Spooning is the best way to catch a bunch a stripers in a very short time.

Smallmouth bass are observing the feeding stripers and get very excited about their feeding behavior. If shad, spoons, crank baits, or surface lures come near, smallmouth bass will join in on the action. Bass fishing is excellent right now as water temperature drops and stripers drive shad toward the shoreline.

Do not be surprised if walleye, largemouth bass, sunfish and bluegill are caught at the same time all the smallmouth and striper activity is occurring. The summer boating crowds are now declining. Water and air temperature are falling. The lake is now heading to excellent fishing success such as that seen in April and May. The best time to fish in the Fall is from September 15th to October 15th. The fun times are right around the corner. Come and join in on the fun.

(Aug 24) by Wayne Gustaveson

Lake elevation: 3,599 feet Water temperatures: 78–83°F

Fishing is picking up over the length of Lake Powell. The southern lake is providing decent bait fishing and successful deep water trolling for stripers. Bass fishing is good lake wide. Here are the details.

It is critically important to begin fishing as early as possible. Smallmouth bass are still responding to surface lures at first light. Stripers are most active for the first two hours of daylight. They can be caught on bait, deep trolling and an occasional small boil. Regardless of the technique the results at 6 a.m. far outweigh the catch that happens at 10 a.m. with the same effort. The first rule is to go early.

The next rule is to head north. Best fishing success on Lake Powell is in Good Hope Bay. The upper San Juan is good at times, as is the Escalante. However, Good Hope Bay is the best. Good Hope has the biggest shad population, and therefore the most striped bass that spend their lives in pursuit of shad.

A typical day at Good Hope begins with an occasional striper boil, but more often there are individual stripers chasing shad that can be seen jumping when looking toward the sunrise. These small splashes are backlit by the rising sun and easy to see over long distances. Cruise toward the splashes and throw surface lures when in range. Catching fish on top is the best, but watching the graph is critical if catching a bunch of fish is the goal. Down below the jumping fish are huge schools of stripers moving silently while waiting to interact with a deep shad school. When the big striper school is seen, drop spoons into the school for quick results. The schools are often suspended so it is important to know the depth of the spoon. The best way is to drop the spoon to the bottom and then speed reel back to the school. If the bottom is at 90 feet and the school is at 50 feet reel up 40 feet and then start jigging. This is easier said than done. Luckily, speed reeling works well on searching stripers. They often tell you when the spoon is at the right depth by biting the lure.

Deep trolling is working well with the best depth being from 15-30 feet. Holding stripers are found in this range and will hit trolled lures moving at the depth schools are holding. Watch the graph and adjust the trolling depth to match the holding depth of striper schools. While trolling other fish like walleye, catfish, and bass will participate. Last week there was a 34-pound striper caught on Lake Canyon Wall, using the deep trolling technique while the lucky angler was trolling from a jet ski!

Lake Powell has an amazing year round fishery.

Regulations

Provo River

Brook Trout, Brown Trout, Cutthroat Trout, Rainbow Trout, Walleye

(Sep 14) Lower: Recreational traffic from tubers has lessened. Watch for PMD and caddis hatches on cloudier days. Fishing has been best early morning and evening. Try using terrestrial patterns, split-cased PMDs, zebra midge, sow bugs, caddis larvae and pupae or Frenchie's.

Middle: There has been a lot of Pale Morning Dun activity. Nymphs, caddis' midges and terrestrials are all productive. Try using San Juan Worms, caddis larvae and pupae, split-cased PMDs, elk hair caddis, terrestrials such as ants, soft hackled-flies, grasshoppers or beetles.

(Aug 24) Lower: There continues to be a lot of recreational pressure from rafters and tubers, so fishing has been best early morning and late evening. Try using sow bugs, split-cased PMDs, San Juan worms, zebra midges, woolly buggers or zonkers.

Middle: Caddis activity is greatest early morning and late evening, and PMD activity is best mid-morning. Dry fly fishing has been consistent, and nymphing continues to remain productive along the Middle Provo River. Try using sow bugs, zebra midges, prince nymphs, split-cased PMDs when nymphing. When using dry flies try using elk hair caddis, or peacock caddis.

Regulations

Starvation Reservoir

Brown Trout, Crayfish, Smouthmouth Bass, Walleye

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Sep 14) Remember: You may may not possess kokanee salmon until December 1. The ranger dock is closed to public use. The water level is at 62 percent and falling. The water temperature is hovering around 65 degrees. Some anglers have reported debris from the fire that may create water hazards, so use caution when boating on the south side of the reservoir. Biologists are encouraging anglers to plan campouts at the reservoir and to target the smaller walleye. Fly anglers recommend using fast sinking lines and size 6-10 bead head flies in multiple colors. We recommend using the same technique as from a boat (jighead and worm) and just fish in the evening and after the sun goes down. Anglers are being encouraged to harvest these small walleye to help balance the fishery out and produce healthier walleye populations. You can also try using bottom bouncers with nightcrawlers for the walleye. For smallmouth bass, fish the rock edges. If you catch crappie, consider voluntarily releasing them so this population can establish.

(Sep 1) Remember, anglers may not possess kokanee salmon from September 10 through November 30. The Starvation Kayak Bass Fishing Tournament will be taking place on Sept. 1 from 7 a.m.–2 p.m. The reservoir water level is at 64 percent and dropping, with water temperatures hovering around 65 degrees. Some anglers have reported debris from the fire that may create water hazards, so take caution when boating on the south side of the reservoir. Biologists are encouraging anglers to plan campouts at the reservoir and to target the smaller walleye. Fly anglers recommend using fast sinking lines and size 6-10 bead head flies in multiple colors. We recommend using the same technique as from a boat (jighead and worm) and just fish in the evening and after the sun goes down. Anglers are being encouraged to harvest these small walleye to help balance the fishery out and produce healthier walleye populations. You can also try using bottom bouncers with nightcrawlers for the walleye. For smallmouth bass, fish the rock edges. If you catch crappie, consider voluntarily releasing them so this population can establish.

Regulations

Utah Lake

Bluegill, Bullhead Catfish, Channel Catfish, Largemouth Bass, Smouthmouth Bass, Walleye, White Bass

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Sep 14) Anglers are catching 25-inch and larger channel catfish, carp, walleye and white bass. For catfish, try using nightcrawlers, Magic Catfish Bait, chicken livers encased in nude nylon or shrimp soaked in chicken blood. Lindon Harbor and Lincoln Beach are still closed due to an algae bloom.

(Aug 24) Anglers are catching 25-inch (and larger) channel catfish, carp, and white bass. Fishing at night has proved the most productive for catching catfish. For catfish, try using chicken livers encased in nude nylon, shrimp soaked in chicken blood, or white bass cut bait. Due to the recent algal bloom advisories, the Lindon Harbor and Lincoln Beach are closed.

Regulations

Willard Bay

Bullhead Catfish, Channel Catfish, Crappie, Largemouth Bass, Perch, Smallmouth Bass, Walleye, Wipers (hybrid), Yellow Perch

(Sep 14) Anglers report slow fishing for wipers from a boat using shad type lures. Anglers are still reporting decent fishing for catfish.

(Sep 7) Anglers report good fishing for catfish.

(Sep 1) One angler reported good night fishing right after dark for catfish. Between two anglers, they caught 11 nice sized catfish in two hours. Another angler reported slow fishing while trolling for half a day. Anglers trolled using lures and caught a two good-sized catfish and wipers.

Regulations

Yuba Reservoir

Channel Catfish, Northern Pike, Rainbow Trout, Walleye, Yellow Perch

FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORY

(Sep 14) The water levels are extremely low. The Oasis boat ramp is the only open ramp. Fishing has been slow for sportfish, but anglers are catching carp, wipers and channel catfish. For wipers, try using a neon-colored jighead tipped with a nightcrawler and bounce it off the bottom.

(Aug 24) Water levels are critically low, and the Oasis boat ramp is the only ramp that remains open. Fishing has been slow for sportfish, but anglers are catching five-pound plus carp and wipers. For wipers, try using a neon colored jighead with a Lost Creek curly tail grub in chartreuse pearl, pearl, or chartreuse shine.

Regulations









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